nebula

Building Sasha's x0xb0x

85 posts in this topic

So I've been working on populating the revised x0xb0x main board as enhanced by Sasha.  Problem is that there are some components on there (a few resistors, maybe caps too?) which are not listed on the ladyada.net x0xb0x BOM located at http://www.ladyada.net/make/x0xb0x/fab/parts.html

I don't know if I am overlooking something.  For example, there is no R269 and R270 mentioned on Limor's page, but they are on the board.  There are others too.  Is there a more up to date parts list or something?  I've tried searching around but I've had no luck so far.

(EDIT: changed subject, this seems like a good place for a Q&A thread for builders)

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There are some errors in the on line doumentation.

R269 and R270 are 10K.

see: x0x Sequencer Build Page

Hope this helps

You can memo for any more details - I've got a LadyAda kit up and running.

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Thanks, that's exactly what I was looking for.

Two more questions: I don't think I'm going to bother fussing with LED standoffs.  I figure if I can do an MB-6582 matrix with no standoffs, I can do this.  Did Sasha use standoffs?

And one more question:  how is the I/O board held in place?  Is it just with the nuts on the 1/4" jacks?

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Regarding Stand offs, I used them with my flat-topped LED's, and got a good result, I've also done them using a flat panel taped to the front, covering the LED holes, assembled the board to the panel, with the LED's fitted but unsoldered, tapped them into place and soldered them - worked well on a few panels I did. For round top LED's I drilled a plastic spacer, matching the panel to get just the tight amount of 'lift'.

The I/O panel sits quite firmly supported by the jacks, as you say. There is not a lot of weight or stress on it.

That being said, Sasha and I have chatted about doing a board set which doesn't use so many fancy parts, and will work with standard panel pots, (a very good idea if you were talking one on the road). I envisage an 'analog' board, which could be used by analog synth builders on it's own, as a voice card, with options for a cheaper build without the dual transistors, and some mod space; a logic card and a 'front panel' board for the switches, LED's, encoder and display. The display being used with an additional small processor perhaps, as a way of getting rid of the Grayhill switches. Lots more hand wiring, but lots more flexibility too.

Hope it's soon blippin' and trippin'

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Nebula, I build 2 x0xb0xes following the part list from sections pages so didn`t even noticed the documentation error. I advise everybody who is making x0x, no matter how experienced, to follow the ladyada`s building guide. Takes more time, but it is much easier to troubleshoot if something goes wrong.

I didn`t used the proposed standoffs for LEDs nor spacers from ladyada part list because of American measurements that I even don`t know how to read.  ???

I used 10mm male-female metal spacers for attaching the PCB to the case and panel, and LEDs are positioned by eye. I aligned them all to stick out as I wanted, than solder one pin, then recheck to make sure they didn`t moved, and than solder the another pin. The process wasn`t dificult at all even it would be more easier if I used flat LEDs as Mike.

Here is one picture from the VCO testing section. Lo-Fi DIY scope is much better than using the phones.

3000272501_4244b9d80b.jpg

More pictures: http://www.flickr.com/photos/fibra/sets/72157604783740945/

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Any chance that you could post a link to your DIY scope schematics? I've lookad at a few before but am really concerned about frying my computer.

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Nebula, I build 2 x0xb0xes following the part list from sections pages so didn`t even noticed the documentation error. I advise everybody who is making x0x, no matter how experienced, to follow the ladyada`s building guide. Takes more time, but it is much easier to troubleshoot if something goes wrong.

I have gotten ahead of the guide, because I'm still waiting for parts.  I have soldered in all resistors (except thermistors), and some capacitors, and now I am waiting before I install a single transistor or IC.  I plan to follow the guide now.  I don't know if it will cause me trouble or not.  I hope to be able to go through the guide pretty quickly with all that stuff already in place.

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I was also impatient to start building it so I soldered what I`ve got right after I receives the PCBs, but that cost me a lot of unplanned work. What happens is that standard 12x12 buttons i soldered arn`t standard to E-switch guys.  ??? When I realized that E-switch cap don`t fit because of few tenth`s of mm, I had to cut the pins off the buttons in order to avoid damaging the PCB because overheating, I desoldered each pin individually and clean the holes. For 23 buttons it is 92 holes to fix... not an easy task on a double sided board. :P  At least I learn how to properly use desoldering pump, thanks to Mike.  ;)

I know.. It is not very much like your case but still... better to do it in sections. You wan`t make it squelch much sooner soldering a dozen of resistors but you could bitter your life. However, x0x is not difficult project and everybody can make it. Only real problem I got was programming the fuses as there are no guide nor enough tips on how to do it, and there are 2 different fuse set on forum. I finally solved the problem by adding external ceramic resonator to the programming adapter.

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desoldered each pin individually and clean the holes. For 23 buttons it is 92 holes to fix
the best technique is TO NOT SOLDER those tact switch until you are sure that your xox is finished. These switches have enough strength to fit without solder (think to the maintenance)

I plan to follow the guide now.
if it is your 1st x0x you have to do such.

If it is not you can solder things as on a whole kit : first smaller (diodes ...) then resistors, trimmer, condos ... and last the ICs, after you have verified that the Volts are corrects. I did it on a bunch of 3 x0x and they work ! it goes faster too.

Lo-Fi DIY scope is much better than using the phones.
the best is a real oscillospcope and your ears. finally make a A/B test versus a real TB.

Roland Service Manual is very well documented to tune the x0x by the way

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Roland Service Manual is very well documented to tune the x0x by the way

Thank you Julien,

That's some of the most interesting advice I have heard so far.  Right after I'm done this post I'm going to set my sights on a 303 service manual.

You guys will probably think I'm crazy but I have soldered in all resistors, all electrolytic and ceramic caps, and a some polyester caps.  Oh, and sockets for all ICs.

I have selected my LEDs (orange, red and blue) and experimented to find the best resistors for them (470R, 5K6, 9K5 respectively).  So I soldered those resistors in place as well.  Basically I'm hoping I get the rest of my parts and finish the thing in one night.  Still trying to decide whether to use BA662 or BA6110, since I have both on hand.

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whether to use BA662 or BA6110
both sound the same, the 6110 gives you 3dB more level (i tested 6 months ago with a TUNED x0x)

something good to do is sorting 2SA733p in order to keep those with hfe>340.

some of the most interesting advice I have heard so far
the "how to build  the x0x" of Ladyada follows the same indicating points than Roland. And be sure there is not a lot to tune in the x0x : oscillator (TM5 give high range, TM4 low range - or the contrary i don't remember), résonance (TM3), and first : the supply (5,333v)

making the little variable supply as advised by ladyada is very useful. it is low cost and will help you to tune the x0x, and thus, it can be reused latter for other thing :p

what is interested in the Roland manual is the drawing with the value in milliseconds, you don't have to take your calculator to calculate the period of the second wave (2ms +/-0,5)!

Search for "303 schematic" in Google images :)

http://fr.youtube.com/watch?v=C-4kHg4igx0

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... Still trying to decide whether to use BA662 or BA6110, since I have both on hand.

free advice: use the 6110 and send the 662 to me for proper disposal...

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Only real problem I got was programming the fuses as there are no guide nor enough tips on how to do it, and there are 2 different fuse set on forum.

Sasha, what fuse config did you use? Care to list it on this thread for future reference?

I'd like to compare your fuse list against the one I used. Seems that the Atmega on my x0x is having problems outputting correct CV so I'll probably try reprogramming the chip as first measure. There's no activity whatsoever on few of the address pins used for CV generation, hopefully it's not _yet_ another shot chip..  :(

The way this programming crap is going with my setup, I'll pretty soon end up ordering a preprogrammed chip directly from the folks at ladyada.

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You should wright these hex values after you burn the firmware, but make sure you add external ceramic oscilator to a programming adapter before you do this.

lfuse: 0xFF

hfuse: 0xD4

efuse: 0xFF

No need to order preprogramed chip if you have a programmer. Just burn those fuses and it should work.

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Here is the complete method to burn the x0x firmware (less than 2 euros method) :

1 - you need a PC Windows with avrdude installed (winavr does install it)

2 - you need a LPT printer port on the PC. This will be the programming port ; it is the cheapest way and the easiest too. Enable the LPT as a programmer by installing gpio.

I only have Macs so I went to a friend and used his computer

3 - now you make a programmer on a breadboard, following this idea http://www.scienceprog.com/simplest-128-atmega-programmer/.

but we will do a BSD which is natively supported by avrdude :

http://www.bsdhome.com/avrdude/ Miso of LPT goes to MISO of ATmega162 and so on.

Put 220 ohms or 1 Kohm resistors before attacking the AVR. it will prevent eventually electric disaster (cheap and efficient solution)

4 - add a resonator of 16 Mhz (the one of the x0xb0x, recycle ! ) to your programmer in order to burn high and external "fuses"

5- make this supply and supply 5V to the AVR using a 100nF bypass capacitor :

http://www.ladyada.net/library/equipt/diypsupp.html

6- enter DOS (cmd) and type :

Achtung ! : x0xb0x_full.hex must be on your desktop (= bureau)

C:\Documents and Settings\m\Bureau>avrdude -p m162 -c bsd -e

avrdude: AVR device initialized and ready to accept instructions

Reading | ################################################## | 100% 0.03s

avrdude: Device signature = 0x1e9404

avrdude: erasing chip

avrdude: safemode: Fuses OK

avrdude done.  Thank you.

C:\Documents and Settings\m\Bureau>avrdude -p m162 -c bsd -U flash:w:x0xb0x_full

.hex

avrdude: AVR device initialized and ready to accept instructions

Reading | ################################################## | 100% 0.05s

avrdude: Device signature = 0x1e9404

avrdude: NOTE: FLASH memory has been specified, an erase cycle will be performed

         To disable this feature, specify the -D option.

avrdude: erasing chip

avrdude: reading input file "x0xb0x_full.hex"

avrdude: input file x0xb0x_full.hex auto detected as Intel Hex

avrdude: writing flash (16380 bytes):

Writing | ################################################## | 100% 6.63s

avrdude: 16380 bytes of flash written

avrdude: verifying flash memory against x0xb0x_full.hex:

avrdude: load data flash data from input file x0xb0x_full.hex:

avrdude: input file x0xb0x_full.hex auto detected as Intel Hex

avrdude: input file x0xb0x_full.hex contains 16380 bytes

avrdude: reading on-chip flash data:

Reading | ################################################## | 100% 5.98s

avrdude: verifying ...

avrdude: 16380 bytes of flash verified

avrdude: safemode: Fuses OK

avrdude done.  Thank you.

C:\Documents and Settings\m\Bureau>avrdude -p m162 -c bsd -U lfuse:w:0xFF:m

avrdude: AVR device initialized and ready to accept instructions

Reading | ################################################## | 100% 0.03s

avrdude: Device signature = 0x1e9404

avrdude: reading input file "0xFF"

avrdude: writing lfuse (1 bytes):

Writing | ################################################## | 100% 0.03s

avrdude: 1 bytes of lfuse written

avrdude: verifying lfuse memory against 0xFF:

avrdude: load data lfuse data from input file 0xFF:

avrdude: input file 0xFF contains 1 bytes

avrdude: reading on-chip lfuse data:

Reading | ################################################## | 100% 0.03s

avrdude: verifying ...

avrdude: 1 bytes of lfuse verified

avrdude: safemode: Fuses OK

avrdude done.  Thank you.

C:\Documents and Settings\m\Bureau>avrdude -p m162 -c bsd -U hfuse:w:0xD4:m

avrdude: AVR device initialized and ready to accept instructions

Reading | ################################################## | 100% 0.05s

avrdude: Device signature = 0x1e9404

avrdude: reading input file "0xD4"

avrdude: writing hfuse (1 bytes):

Writing | ################################################## | 100% 0.03s

avrdude: 1 bytes of hfuse written

avrdude: verifying hfuse memory against 0xD4:

avrdude: load data hfuse data from input file 0xD4:

avrdude: input file 0xD4 contains 1 bytes

avrdude: reading on-chip hfuse data:

Reading | ################################################## | 100% 0.03s

avrdude: verifying ...

avrdude: 1 bytes of hfuse verified

avrdude: safemode: Fuses OK

avrdude done.  Thank you.

C:\Documents and Settings\m\Bureau>avrdude -p m162 -c bsd -U efuse:w:0xFF:m

avrdude: AVR device initialized and ready to accept instructions

Reading | ################################################## | 100% 0.03s

avrdude: Device signature = 0x1e9404

avrdude: reading input file "0xFF"

avrdude: writing efuse (1 bytes):

Writing | ################################################## | 100% 0.03s

avrdude: 1 bytes of efuse written

avrdude: verifying efuse memory against 0xFF:

avrdude: load data efuse data from input file 0xFF:

avrdude: input file 0xFF contains 1 bytes

avrdude: reading on-chip efuse data:

Reading | ################################################## | 100% 0.03s

avrdude: verifying ...

avrdude: 1 bytes of efuse verified

avrdude: safemode: Fuses OK

avrdude done.  Thank you.

it is possible that it doesn't work at the 1st time. I had problem of supply, furnishing 4,65V instead of 5 V, so i had to reburn it 3 times.

gpio.zip

x0xb0x_full.hex

gpio.zip

x0xb0x_full.hex

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after that you can install the FTDI driver and upload SokkOS using c0ntrol Win 1.0 of ladyada :)

another solution would be to directly burn the firmware using an ISP adapter (like the one of BSD) on the x0xb0x. i did not try it.

the advantage is the supply brought by the x0xb0x itself, and the resonator, already installed. To think ...

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I built and tested another x0xb0x with substitution transistors on non critical places and I can confirm too it work well.

Here is the copy of mail from bcbox from ladyada forum

Hi Sasha,

The 2SC945 is a good substitute for the 2SC5236. It has the same pinout so it's a drop-in replacement.

I have tested them in the non-critical locations and there's no difference. Use them in these location...

2SC945: Q3,Q4,Q5,Q29,Q30,Q32,Q34,Q35,Q37,Q40,Q41,Q50

Cheers,

Brian.

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peepls, i need your help with 9VAC transformer with 2.1mm plug, euro 220V socket.

having difficulty finding one locally. any suggestions where you get yours?

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Just find normal DC adapter and connect the wires directly to the trafo secondary. Just make sure the adapter is hold by screws and it is not glued togerher.

I bought a bunch od old Alcatel mobile 500mA 12V adapters on a flea market very cheap. They are perfect for the x0x.

EDIT:

This is how my second x0xb0x looks like. It has only white diffused LEDs.

3070804124_bd67443da2.jpg

More pix: http://www.flickr.com/photos/fibra

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Hiya

got my x0x finished :) *yayyy

works like a charm from scratch....more pictures here

4002_x0x_finished02_jpg3be8a14977f1afc8d

4002_x0x_finished02_jpg3be8a14977f1afc8d

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MTE ... you're always at the top of the out-there case designs.  Beautiful work.

Did you panel-mount the pots, or did you make a new board for your custom layout?

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Thank you nebula :)

the Panel is complete customized, means al pots, buttons etc mounted on breadboards and wired to the main/io-boards ;)

next time opening the case (for modding) ill take some "inside"-photos ;)

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This is how my second x0xb0x looks like. It has only white diffused LEDs.

lexan paper isn't it ? beautiful 8)

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